Elementary School Handbook
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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HANDBOOK


Contents

Planning Your Science Fair Project
What is a Science Fair Project?
The Steps of the Scientific Method

Page 2

Doing Your Science Fair Project

  1. Your Topic
  2. Getting Ready for Your Experiments
  3. Do the Experiment
  4. Put the Results in Order
  5. Finishing

Page 3

  1. Write a Formal Report
  2. Making Your Backboard
  3. How My Teacher May Help
  4. How My Parents May Help


PLANNING YOUR SCIENCE FAIR PROJECT

The Scientific Method

  • The scientific method is one way to solve problems.
  • Scientists use this method because its step by step pattern and giving of facts is easy for others to understand.

WHAT IS A SCIENCE FAIR PROJECT?

  • A good science fair project is a way of finding out about something you want to know more about.
  • During your experiments, you write a DIARY or JOURNAL about what is happening.
  • This diary or journal is called a LOG or LOGBOOK.
  • After you finish the experiments, you will write a FORMAL REPORT about what you have done.
  • Finally you will make a DISPLAY of your work.


ALWAYS WRITE EVERYTHING YOU DO IN YOUR LOGBOOK


THE STEPS OF THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD

    1. QUESTION or PROBLEM

    • This introduces your topic in a statement that will tell others what you are trying to understand.
    • Think of some science question you want to answer.
    • Or think or something in science you want to find more about.

(Write the question or problem in your logbook.)

    2. HYPOTHESIS

    • Read about your topic.
    • Then make a good guess about what you think will happen when you work with your problem or question.

(Write the hypothesis in your logbook.)

    3. EXPERIMENTAL PLAN

    • Write down the steps you will use to find out about your question or problem.
    • Find ways to test your hypothesis.
    • Include any measurements you will be making.
    • Include the materials you will be using.

(Write the plan in your logbook.)

    4. OBSERVATION or DATA from your EXPERIMENT

    • Follow your experimental plan.
    • Everything you do with your experiment must be written in your logbook.
    • This is usually done day by day.
    • It may change according to your plan.
    • All measurements should be in metric units.

(Write in your logbook all the data or information.)

    5. RESULTS

    • Put your data from the experiment in an order that helps you understand what has happened.
    • Make a bar graph, line graph or pie graph to show what has happened.

(Write all your results in your logbook.)

    6. CONCLUSIONS

    • Explain how you arrived at your conclusions.
    • Do the results of your experiments support your hypothesis?
    • Explain how the results support your hypothesis.
    • Or explain how the results DO NOT support your hypothesis.
  • YOUR EXPERIMENT IS NOT A FAILURE JUST BECAUSE THE RESULTS DO NOT AGREE WITH YOUR HYPOTHESIS!

(Write your conclusions in your logbook.)


Continue to Page 2


© 1998 by Dennis D. Winkle
Last Revision - 6/12/98